One Room With A View

You may have noticed I’ve gone a bit quiet recently. And it’s because of a very exciting thing.

I’ve started writing for the fabulous https://oneroomwithaview.com/ which you should definitely definitely check out.

I did a piece about Despicable Me here.

And a review of The Overnight here.

Keep your eyes peeled over there for more exciting film writing, and keep your eyes peeled here for some Edinburgh recommendations next month, in between my flyering on the Royal Mile.

Peace out kids

It’s all go!

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Why I love films

I’ve been neglecting my film reviews a bit recently. Other writing has taken hold of me, and life has gotten in the way. But I wrote this, about why I love films and always will.

When you watch a really good film it’s like you live inside it for a while. You get to step outside your own life and into someone else’s. You don’t have to think about bills or washing or boys or girls or the horrible things happening in the world or that text from your mum you need to reply to. For those few hours, in a dark room with strangers, you can live through someone else. And I think that is the most wonderful thing in the world.

You come together, in a specific place at a specific time and you get to share something with a room full of people you have likely never met before and probably never will again. And all of these random people share the same emotions and stories and characters. That’s why it’s so wonderful when you say to someone ‘have you seen this film?’ and they reply with an emphatic yes, declare their undying love for it, and in that instant you have a connection with them through the film you have shared. You know you have likely laughed and cried at the same moments, your hearts have swelled at the same grand sweeps of score and you’ve both had your breath taken away at a twist in the tale.

And when you rewatch a film like this, one that made you forget everything else in the entire world, you know for sure you can return to that magic. When the lights go down in the cinema, when the adverts end, as the BBFC sign flashes up on screen and you hear the music for whichever production company the film belongs to – my heart honestly flutters every single time. Sometimes if I see an advert on TV that I’m used to seeing in the cinema (always Barclays) I get that little flutter then too.

And knowing about films makes it all so more exciting. Recognising actors, seeing them flourish in different roles and flop in others… seeing a director develop as time goes on, and doing it all backwards, so you’re watching early Tarantino three years after you watched Django Unchained, your first. So you learn, and develop as a film watcher.

Chloe Moretz once said of films – “Instead of getting drunk or doing drugs you can go see a movie for an hour and a half and escape and be someone else and live a different life, if only for a little while.”

And I think that is the most wonderful thing that films can do. They tell stories, on screen, in a visual and tactile way. They can make millions of people, across decades feel the same feelings and learn the same lessons. It means that sat in my bedroom in south London watching old films, I’m connected to so many more people that have gone before me, and that will continue long after me.

International Women’s Day

To commemorate International Women’s Day I contributed to this piece for Bechdel Test Fest about the best female characters on film. The other volunteers answers are wonderful, and today is such a great opportunity to recognise the great female characters out there, and think about how much more we can do with film to create real and recognisable female characters on screen. So much of my life has been made up of film watching experiences, so to have role models on screen for young girls is so important – currently there is only one female on screen to every 2.24 females, whilst we still make up 50% of the population.

Other great female characters on film can be found in this piece I wrote with Briony a while back, and you can find what I said about the first Bechdel Test Fest event here.

Bechdel Test Fest presents: Reclaim the Rom-com

I was lucky enough to get free tickets for the launching of the Bechdel Test Fest, hosted at the wonderful Genesis Cinema in Whitechapel by Corrina Antrobus. In the first of what looks like a great schedule coming up we examined the merits and pitfalls of romantic comedies as a genre, and questioned: can rom-coms ever be feminist? There is, inherent in the genre of rom-coms, feminist potential. A group of women go to the cinema together, to see these films, share these stories. Why then, can they not manage, on the whole, to match up to the real lives of the women going to see the films?

First up, a love note to Genesis Cinema.

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I believe that the kind of cinema you watch a film in has an impact on how you view a film; the customer service you receive, the environment inside, the price of a ticket. Genesis cinema has the feel of a cinema that truly loves film, with wonderful posters everywhere, coffee in abundance and a great bar area upstairs – where we were seated, ready and waiting to reclaim the rom-com.

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We started with Obvious Child, starring Jenny Slate as recently dumped stand-up comedian Donna, who finds herself pregnant after a one night stand with Max (Jake Lacy). It’s a very frank and open story of pregnancy and abortion, and feels like the most real film about abortion to come out of the world of cinema. But I hope that’s not the only thing that anyone viewing this film takes from it, because it shouldn’t just be defined by its wonderful depiction of abortion. As well as that, it’s genuinely laugh out loud funny with a great script, as well as having genuinely heartfelt moments. Jenny Slate is amazing and, fun fact, she really was a gigging stand-up when she was approached to star in the film. The film also manages to depict how a comic’s life affects their routine, and what baring your soul on stage in the name of comedy can do. Obvious Child is a love story, yes, but it’s also about learning to love yourself and allowing yourself to be loved at difficult times in your life, whether that be by your friends, lovers or parents.

It seems to subvert many rom-com tropes; Donna is the character who needs to grow up, prepare for commitment or love, whilst Max, the male love interest, is the one who seems to have his life together and is the character who pushes for more of a romantic relationship. Plus, post watching the film I have been listening to Paul Simon on repeat non-stop and dancing around in the endless hope I will become Jenny Slate.

Following the film was a discussion from a panel featuring film academics and journalists; Corrina Antrobus was joined by Chloe Angyal, Alice Guilluy and Simran Hans.

In case you’re unaware, the Bechdel Test was developed by cartoonist Alison Bechdel, as a joke about how the test for if movies ‘pass’ should be if they have two named female characters who have a conversation that isn’t about a man. It was created 30 years ago, and has, especially in recent years, become feminist film critic’s calling card. However the panel, whom I quite agree with, were keen to point out that the test is merely a starting point. It doesn’t mean a film is feminist and there are many feminist films which wouldn’t pass, like Gravity and 10 Things I Hate About You, that could still be considered feminist. It is, in the grand scheme of all things that go on in film making, a low bar to try and pass, and when films fail it highlights more than anything just how few female characters there are in movies.

Interestingly, it was pointed out that romantic comedies in general are some of the most belittled films in popular culture – because they are designed for women. Because of this they’re seen as low culture or ‘guilty pleasures’. This discrediting of culture for women is a sad trend, but films like Obvious Child suggest that genuinely great and funny movies can be made, not just for women, but about women. It seems it is thought that films about women are for women only, and men couldn’t possibly enjoy them, whilst all other films should be endured by men and women alike. It’s also a trope that you find in comedy, with female comics getting turned down for gigs because there’s already a woman on the bill, or being thought of as just funny to women – as though gender has an impact on what you find funny or not.

But, in 2015, we still have a sexist pop culture. This, the panel argued, means that the perfect feminist piece of film could not exist, because sexism is inherent in the film industry. A part of this problem of there not being one ‘perfect’ feminist rom com is that there is no one feminist. Not all women are the same is very much the point of feminism, but feminists get grouped together under one umbrella of set opinions, despite being composed of different women with different views, experiences, and opinions. What one woman might consider to be a piece of feminist cinema might be another’s worst nightmare. We are all human and taste is subjective; this is still true if you happen to believe that men and women should be equal.

And when we do get rom-coms that don’t appear to tick our feminist film boxes it seems to be more of an issue than when it happens with big blockbusters or action movies, as though only rom-coms should be put under the microscope; as to why this might be I’m afraid I have no answers. Perhaps because rom-coms are the one genre that focus more on women’s stories it shows all the more when these female characters are unbelievable, two dimensional or forever repeating the same blueprint.  

The second film shown was The Philadelphia Story, re-released in cinemas this week and starring the indomitable Katharine Hepburn as Tracy Lord, a woman caught in a love triangle in the run up to her second wedding. Also featuring Cary Grant and Jimmy Stewart, the film was based on the Broadway musical of the same name and was released in 1940, at the height of the screwball comedy trend. It has great female characters who never stop matching the men in their wit or charm, such as the wise-cracking younger sister of Tracy played by Mary Nash, and the photographer working on a piece about the wedding, played by Ruth Hussey. These are all well developed and realistic female characters that you leave the film feeling like you know in a way that I don’t think you get from a lot of female characters in contemporary film.

The Bechdel Test Fest is going to go on and host more events, celebrating women on film and they’ve got some great events coming up. It’s a wonderful platform and I’m so pleased this is something that’s being discussed in a fun and entertaining way. Check out their Facebook and website.

The Bechdel Test asks that films have more than one named female character. All I ask from films is that they show me real women, in real situations, having real conversations. I want to see something recognisable on screen.

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Twinkle Twinkle Little Star Ratings

If you regularly read my film reviews – and if you don’t then why not – you might notice I don’t do star ratings. I did them in my very first reviews on here, of Cloud Atlas and I Give it a Year (4 and 3 stars respectively) and then stopped after that. The Guardian does them, The Times and Empire all do them, and when I’m looking for a film to watch I’ll look up the Rotten Tomatoes score if I haven’t heard of it. I just have a problem with prescribing them myself.

Take the two films above for example. I’ve decided that Cloud Atlas is better than I Give It a Year. But I saw I Give It A Year first, so set the bar with the first film, without Cloud Atlas to compare it to. This is a problem that can go on forever until you’ve seen all the films for all eternity and work out how you’re ranking your Godfathers against your Grace of Monaco’s.

Now, clearly, this isn’t possible and I’m exaggerating. But if you were to see one film, and decide to give it 3 stars, say, The Talented Mr Ripley, and then you saw the similar but better Catch Me If You Can, you’ve got to give that more stars. Even if really you only think it’s a 3 star film and poor old Mr Ripley is only a 2.

Star Ratings can be handy if you’re only glancing at a review, and want to get the point quickly – if a film has 1 star you definitely won’t be bothering but if it has 4 you might take a punt. But for me, I don’t feel comfortable coming to a decision that final. Often I’m not entirely sure of my thoughts until I’ve written them down and read it back. In a review you can talk about the nuances of a film, the good points and bad points in a way that explains your view of it without revealing anything which would spoil enjoyment.  As Frankie Boyle put it on Twitter last September:tweet

The way you judge one film is going to differ from the way you judge another, (as it should) and you can’t, for example, compare a silent 1927 Hitchcock film within the same parameters as something like a 2014 Michael Bay film. As time moves on the boundaries of what is expected from blockbuster cinema fluctuates and, as well as changing technology, cinema is partly ruled by what is fashionable. Each film you see will have its own merits and its own downfalls, and will be loved by different people for different reasons. For me to put a number on this makes 0 star of sense.

 

 

 

BAFTA – A week on

Last Sunday, as I’m sure you’re aware, was the BAFTA awards. As a film blog you might have thought I’d have written something about it, perhaps a ‘best dressed list’ or a ‘who should have won’ piece.

A week on, I wanted to just say a little something. In the Those We Have Lost segment, there was a picture and a mention of my dad, who died in November. He was a film journalist for 25 years and inspired my love of film. He helped me write my very first blog posts on here and taught me about writing about film. He did a lot of work for BAFTA and we would pop in from time to time – quite often just to go for a wee as we passed, which would give dad the opportunity for his joke “most expensive wee I’ve ever had.”

My dad loved film. He loved old films and old movie stars and old Hollywood and great directors and genius cinematographers. In his office there are hundreds of books about film,  most of which he would pick up second hand, because they that meant they were his two favourite things; old, and a bargain. In the segment on last week’s show, the photo of dad was included amongst actors such as Peter O’Toole and Joan Fontaine, kings and queens of the silver screen. I know that the honour of being up there with them would have meant a tremendous amount to him.

In amongst the politics and paparazzi of the awards, I just wanted to say thank you to BAFTA and to anyone who helped my dad to be remembered on that screen with those people.

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